It’s Official, McDonald’s And Monsanto Are Both ‘Losing Money Fast’ – Anti Media News

 

CNN asks, ‘Is McDonald’s doomed?’ Business Insider declares that ‘McDonald’s Is Losing America’ as the company fires its own CEO. What’s happening? As it turns out, the world is starting to ask what they’re truly eating in their food — and the new conglomerate of natural grocers and restaurants are trailblazing the way into an entirely new economic environment. 

 

 

In other words: people are simply tired of shoveling garbage into their bodies, and they’re not going to put up with it anymore.

Here’s just a few of the ingredients you can find in many fast food meals:

So are you surprised to find that many are turning away from fast food leaders like McDonald’s?

McDonald’s restaurants operated in Bolivia for 14 years, according to Hispanically Speaking. In 2002, they had to shutter their final remaining 8 stores because they simply couldn’t turn a profit—and if you know fast food companies, you know it’s not because they didn’t try.

The Golden Arches sunk plenty of money into marketing and campaigning—trying to get the food-loving Bolivians to warm to their French fries and burgers, but it simply wasn’t happening.


Paul R. La Monica, reporting for the CNN Money column, writes:

Are the meals no longer as happy for McDonald’s customers as they used to be? The fast food giant definitely seems worried.

McDonald’s (MCD) reported lackluster quarterly results last week. And company executives used the words “relevance,” “relevant” and “relevancy” a combined 20 times during its conference call with analysts. Translation: the leaders of the Golden Arches are very concerned about whether the company is still relevant.

If you look at the expected growth rates for Mickey D’s biggest burger rivals — as well as upstarts in the so-called fast casual restaurant chain industry — I’d be “Grimace”-ing too. (Sorry. But I miss that purple blob!)

Monsanto Co. on Wednesday reported a loss of $156 million in its fiscal fourth quarter.

The St. Louis-based company said it had a loss of 31 cents per share. Losses, adjusted for non-recurring costs, came to 27 cents per share.

The results missed Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for a loss of 24 cents per share.

 

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